Lesson Plans

AP United States History Course

Sara A. Ameen

2019-2020

 

Overview

 

This course is taught over a one-year period. Each school year is divided into four terms. The first term begins in August 2019 and the last term ends in June 2020.

 

Advanced Placement United States History is a chronological and thematic survey course in United States History covering the time period of Colonial America (1492) to contemporary America (2000). Bright Star School’s Advanced Placement program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge to deal critically with the problems and issues faced by the people and leaders in United States of America.

 

The course will put special emphasis on key historical themes including: American diversity, identity, culture, demographic changes, economic transformations, the environment, globalization, politics and citizenship, reforms, religion, slavery and its legacies in North America, and war and diplomacy.

 

 

Advanced Placement U.S. History

Advanced Placement U.S. History is a college-level introductory course that examines the nation’s political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history from 1491 to the present. A variety of instructional approaches are employed and a college-level textbook is supplemented by primary and secondary sources.

 

Unit Activities

Lecture and Discussion of Topics: Students will participate in discussions based on course topics. Reading quiz content is embedded in class discussions.

Primary Source Analysis: Students analyze primary sources using notecards on which they identify, analyze, and evaluate each of the sources. Students analyze the sources for two or more of the following features: historical context, purpose and intended audience, the author’s point of view, type of source, argument and tone.

Author’s Thesis Paper: Students are provided with opposing viewpoints expressed in either primary or secondary source documents, and in writing, must determine the following:

The Thesis:

• What is the main argument of each author?

 

The Evidence:

• Look at the supporting evidence and analyze whether the authors interpret that evidence logically. Do they clearly support the thesis?

 

Critical Analysis:

• What do the sources add to your own understanding of the topic?

• What points are strongly made and well-documented?

 

Final Analysis: (Your opinion is expressed here without the use of any form of the pronoun “I.”)

• Which of the sources makes the most convincing case and why?

 

For each source, complete the thesis, evidence, and critical analysis sections.

You Be the Judge (YBTJ): Students analyze disparate primary source documents on the same topic. Students then compare and contrast the viewpoints expressed in the documents, and—supported by the evidence presented, and in the context of the historical period—determine which authors made a stronger case.

History in the Making Assignments: Students will compare how the issues they are studying were covered by American history textbooks in the past. They will then assess the extent to which earlier interpretations differ from that presented in their text.

Document-Based Questions (DBQs): Students, working in groups, will read the sources provided with the DBQ and debate the DBQ posed. In some cases, they will write on the DBQ as indicated in the course schedule below and in accordance with AP standards for DBQs.

Six Degrees of Separation: Students will be provided with two events spanning decades, but related by their theme. They will select six events in chronological order that link the first event in the series with the last.

 

AP® U.S. History: Syllabus

Students will write the name of each selected event, and use their research and knowledge of the time period to describe and emphasize the ways in which the events are connected and demonstrate continuity and change over time. There will be at least one Six Degrees of Separation assignment per unit.

Chronological Reasoning Lesson: Students are provided with ten events, in no particular chronological order, which they will then place in order, naming the decade in which each occurred.

Students will complete the exercise by providing the following:

1. Identify the period in which these occur;

2. Identify continuity and change over time exemplified by the selections; and

3. Identify the theme(s) under which these issues and developments might be categorized.

 

Celebration of Knowledge: An exam, known as a Celebration of Knowledge, will be given at the end of each unit. The exam will have three components: analytical multiple-choice questions (MC), analytical short-answer questions (SA), and either a long-essay question or a document-based question (DBQ) that requires a thesis statement supported with evidence and analysis. Each component of the exam will emphasize the application of the following historical thinking skills to answer the question. Information from prior units is often a critical component of the response:

I. Analyzing Historical Sources and Evidence 1. Analyzing Evidence: Content and Sourcing

2. Interpretation

 

II. Making Historical Connections 3. Comparison

4. Contextualization

 

III. Chronological Reasoning 5. Causation

6. Continuity and Change over Time

 

IV. Creating and Supporting a Historical Argument 7. Argument Development

 

 

Essays: Students will be asked to write college-level essays that require a thesis statement and supporting evidence drawn from course materials.

 

The above boldfaced activities are organized around AP U.S. History’s major themes—American and National Identity (NAT), Politics and Power (POL), Work, Exchange, and Technology (WXT), Culture and Society (CUL), Migration and Settlement (MIG), Geography and the Environment (GEO), and America in the World (WOR)—and are designed to develop students’ historical thinking skills.

Grading Criteria

Students’ grades will be determined by teachers, peers, and self-evaluation. Students are responsible for keeping track of their own grades. Graded work will include reading quizzes, logs, unit exams, revised writings, and projects. Specific assignments and activities are described in the unit outline below.

Reading Quizzes: Students will periodically take reading quizzes on the chapter assignments, usually every Monday. These quizzes are integrated into class discussions.

 

 

 

Primary Textbook

Kennedy, David M., Lizabeth Cohen, and Thomas A Bailey. The American Pageant. 16th ed. Boston: Cengage Learning, 2017. [CR1a]

[CR1a] — The course includes a college-level U.S. history textbook.

Primary Sources

Dollar, Charles M. and Gary W. Reichard. American Issues: A Documentary Reader. 1st ed. New York: Random House, 1988.

Shi, David and Holly Mayer. For the Record: A Documentary History of America: From First Contact through Reconstruction, Volume 1. 2nd ed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2004.

Shi, David and Holly Mayer. For the Record: A Documentary History of America: From Reconstruction through Contemporary Times, Volume 2. 2nd ed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2004.

Dudley, William and John C. Chalberg, eds. Opposing Viewpoints in American History: From Colonial Time to Reconstruction, Volume 1. Farmington Hills, MI: Greenhaven Press, 2006.

Dudley, William and John C. Chalberg, eds. Opposing Viewpoints in American History: From Reconstruction to the Present, Volume 2. Farmington Hills, MI: Greenhaven Press, 2006.

Bailey, Thomas A. and David M. Kennedy. The American Spirit: United States History as Seen by Contemporaries, Volume 1. 6th ed. Lexington, MA: D. C. Heath & Co., 1987.

Bailey, Thomas A. and David M. Kennedy. The American Spirit: United States History as Seen by Contemporaries, Volume 2. 6th ed. Lexington, MA: D. C. Heath & Co., 1987.

Secondary Sources

Bennett, William. America: The Last Best Hope, Volume 1: From the Age of Discovery to a World at War. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson, 2007.

Zinn, Howard. A People’s History of the United States. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classic, 2005.

American Heritage, ed. A Sense of History. New York: ibooks, Inc., 2003.

Taylor, Alan. American Colonies: The Settling of North America. New York: Penguin Books, 2002. [CR1c]

Davis, Allen F. and Harold D. Woodman, eds. Conflict and Consensus in American History. Lexington, MA: D. C. Heath & Co., 1984. [CR1c]

Barry, Dave. Dave Barry Slept Here: A Sort of History of the United States. New York: Ballantine Books, 1997.

Franklin, John Hope and Alfred A. Moss, Jr., eds. From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African Americans. 8th ed. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2009. [CR1c]

McClellan, Jim, ed. Historical Moments: Changing Interpretations of America’s Past, Volume 1: The Pre-Colonial Period through the Civil War. 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill/Dushkin, 2000.

McClellan, Jim, ed. Historical Moments: Changing Interpretations of America’s Past, Volume 2: The Civil War through the 20th Century. 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill/Dushkin, 2000.

 

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AP® U.S. History: Syllabus

Garraty, John A., ed. Historical Viewpoints, Volume 1: To 1877. 9th ed. New York: Pearson, 2003.

Garraty, John A., ed. Historical Viewpoints, Volume 2: Since 1865. 9th ed. New York: Pearson, 2003.

Ward, Kyle. History in the Making: An Absorbing Look at How American History Has Changes in the Telling over the Last 200 Years. New York: New Press, 2007.

Allen, Frederick Lewis. Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920s. New York: Harper Perennial, 2000.

Oates, Stephen B. Portrait of America, Combined Edition. 7th ed. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.

Jacobson, Sid and Ernie Colón. The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaptation. New York: Hill and Wang, 2006.

Brinkley, Alan and Davis Dyer, eds. The American Presidency. 1st ed. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2005.

Hymowitz, Carol and Michaele Weissman. A History of Women in America. New York: Bantam, 1990. [CR1c]

[CR1c] — The course includes multiple secondary sources written by historians or scholars interpreting the past.

 

Unit 1: 1491-1607 [CR2]

[CR2] — Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

The American Pageant, Chapters 1-3

Content: Geography and environment of the Americas; Native American diversity in the Americas before the arrival of Europeans; Spain in the Americas; conflict and exchange; English, French, and Dutch settlements; and the Atlantic economy.

Primary Source Analysis: Notecards for primary sources theme.

Sources: Woodcuts from the settling of Jamestown and photos of Native American jewelry and pottery; [CR1b: visual] Christopher Columbus’s “Letter to Luis de Santangel” (1909-1914); [CR1b: textual] a letter describing Native Americans; and a map of American Indian pre-1492 demographics. [CR1b: map]

[CR1b] — The course includes diverse primary sources including written documents and images as well as maps and quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables).

Author’s Thesis Paper: Students read an excerpt from 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus by Charles C. Mann (New York: Vintage, 2006), an excerpt from Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States, and an excerpt from William Bennett’s America: The Last Best Hope, Volume 1: From the Age of Discovery to a World at War (Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson, 2007). Using evidence and analysis from these materials, students will write an essay with a thesis that establishes a historically defensible and evaluative claim supported by historical evidence in response to the question: “Were the conquistadores immoral?” [CR1c] [CR6]

[CR1c] — The course includes multiple secondary sources written by historians or scholars interpreting the past.

[CR6] — Students are provided opportunities to analyze and evaluate diverse historical interpretations. — Analyzing Secondary Sources

You Be the Judge: Documents: John Marston, Ben Jonson, and George Chapman’s play, Eastward Hoe (1605) vs. The Tragical Relation of the Virginia Assembly (1624).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AP® U.S. History: Syllabus

 

History in the Making Assignments: Kyle Ward’s History in the Making, Chapter 1 “Native American Relations with the New Colonists” and Chapter 5 “Captain John Smith and Pocahontas.”

DBQ: Students write an essay on a teacher-created DBQ on the Columbian Exchange.

Six Degrees of Separation: From 1491 to Jamestown.

Unit I Celebration of Knowledge: Six multiple-choice questions, two short-answer questions, and one teacher-created long-essay question on the economic significance of Indian/settler interactions.

 

Unit 2: 1607-1754 [CR2]

[CR2] — Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

The American Pageant, Chapters 2-4

Content: Growing trade; unfree labor; political differences across the colonies; conflict with Native Americans; immigration; early cities; role of women, education, religion and culture; and growing tensions with the British.

Primary Source Analysis: “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards (1741); [CR1b: textual] an indentured servant’s letter home; Bacon’s Manifesto (1676); the Maryland Toleration Act (1649); a letter about small pox inoculation; map of a Puritan town; [CR1b: maps] painting of a colonial Virginia tobacco farm; [CR1b: visual] and colonial export chart broken down by region and products. [CR1b: quantitative]

[CR1b] — The course includes diverse primary sources including written documents and images as well as maps and quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables).

Author’s Thesis Paper: Students read “The Puritans and Sex” by Edmund Morgan [The New England Quarterly 15, no. 4 (Dec 1942): 591-607]; “Persistent Localism” by T. H. Breen [The William and Mary Quarterly 32, no. 1 (Jan 1975): 3-28]; and “When Cotton Mather Fought the Smallpox” by Dr. Laurence Farmer [American Heritage Magazine 8, no. 5 (August 1957): 40]. Then, working in groups, students develop a class presentation that analyzes reasons for the development of different labor systems in any two of the following regions of British colonial settlement: New England, the Chesapeake, the southernmost Atlantic coast, and the British West Indies. (WXT-1.0) [CR4] [CR7]

[CR4] — Students are provided opportunities to apply learning objectives in each of the themes throughout the course.

[CR7] — Students are provided opportunities to compare historical developments across or within societies in various chronological and geographical contexts. — Comparison

You Be the Judge: Students compare and contrast John Winthrop’s “Letters to his wife” (1630 to 1649) vs. William Pond’s “A Letter to Father and Mother” (1631), and Benjamin Franklin’s “Apology for Printers” (1731) vs. “Letter to Thomas Clap” (1759).

History in the Making Assignments: History in the Making, Chapter 8 “Witchcraft in the Colonies.” Students will document the key facts of the witchcraft trials and analyze how the trials were covered in student textbooks throughout U. S. history. Students will write an argumentative essay and explain how the witchcraft trials help us understand the nature of knowledge, gender roles, and patriarchy in the Colonial Era. [CR3]

[CR3] — Students are provided opportunities to investigate key and supporting concepts through the in-depth study and application of specific historical evidence or examples.

 

 

AP® U.S. History: Syllabus

Essay: Students will write an essay supporting and developing a clear thesis regarding which Puritan ideas and values had the most influence on the political, economic, and social development of the New England colonies from 1630 through the 1660s. [CR12]

[CR12] — Students are provided opportunities to develop and substantiate an argument using historical reasoning, considering ways diverse or alternative evidence could be used to support, qualify, or modify the argument. — Argument Development

Six Degrees of Separation: From Jamestown to the French and Indian War.

Unit 2 Celebration of Knowledge: Nine multiple-choice questions, three short-answer questions, and one teacher created long-essay question on colonial development.

Unit 3: 1754-1800 [CR2]

[CR2] — Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

The American Pageant, Chapters 5-10

Content: Colonial society before the war for independence; colonial rivalries; the Seven Years’ War; pirates and other democrats; role of women before, during, and after 1776; articles and a Constitution; and early political rights and exclusions.

Primary Source Analysis: Speeches at Fort Pitt by Tecumseh; Declaration of Rights and Grievances (1774); letters from a PA Farmer; Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense” pamphlet (1776); [CR1b: textual] the Declaration of Independence (1776); Thomas Paine’s “The American Crisis” (1776); A Proclamation of Shaysite Grievances (1786); the United States Constitution; the Federalist #45 (1788); Jefferson’s first inaugural address (1801); Washington’s farewell address (1796); KY and VA Resolutions; map of Northwest Ordinance/slavery abolition (from AP exam); [CR1b: maps] and two artists’ contrasting views of the Boston Massacre.

Drawing on primary sources, students engage in a debate over the question: “Did the Revolution assert British rights or did it create an American national identity?” (NAT-3.0) [CR4] [CR12]

[CR1b] — The course includes diverse primary sources including written documents and images as well as maps and quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables).

[CR4] — Students are provided opportunities to apply learning objectives in each of the themes throughout the course.

[CR12] — Students are provided opportunities to develop and substantiate an argument using historical reasoning, considering ways diverse or alternative evidence could be used to support, qualify, or modify the argument. — Argument Development

Author’s Thesis Paper: “Women and the Revolution” by Mary Beth Norton (in Liberty's Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1996); “A Revolution to Conserve” by Clinton Rossiter (in The First American Revolution. New York: Mariner Books, 1956); and “The Transit of Power” by Richard Hofstadter (in The Idea of a Party System: The Rise of Legitimate Opposition in the United States, 1780-1840. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1970). [CR1c]

[CR1c] — The course includes multiple secondary sources written by historians or scholars interpreting the past.

You Be the Judge: Thomas Jefferson from The Kentucky Resolutions of 1798 vs. George Washington’s farewell address (1796); James Madison’s Federalist #10 (1787) vs. Patrick Henry at the Virginia Ratifying Convention (1788); and Alexander Hamilton’s Report on the Subject of Manufactures (1791) vs. Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on

 

AP® U.S. History: Syllabus

the State of Virginia (1781). [CR1b: textual] In small groups, students will examine each primary source for the following features: the author’s point of view, author’s purpose, audience, and historical context. Then, students will present their findings to the entire class. [CR5]

[CR1b] — The course includes diverse primary sources including written documents and images as well as maps and quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables).

[CR5] — Students are provided opportunities to analyze primary sources and explain the significance of an author’s point of view, author’s purpose, audience, and historical context. — Analyzing Primary Sources

History in the Making Assignments: History in the Making, Chapter 12 “Lexington and Concord” and Chapter 14 “Women in the Revolutionary War.”

Six Degrees of Separation: Drawing on assigned secondary sources, students will write an essay, including a historically and evaluative thesis statement that traces the growth of the idea of civil and individual rights from the Declaration of Independence to the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Students then work in small groups to brainstorm ways that the growth of these political rights relates to economic ideals (laissez-faire) and American national identity during these years. They then write a paragraph on one of these topics as the conclusion of their essay. [CR10]

[CR10] — Students are provided opportunities to identify and explain patterns of continuity and change over time, explaining why these patterns are historically significant. — Continuity and Change Over Time

Meeting of the Minds: Each student will research an individual from an assigned era in preparation for an in-class role-playing exercise. The discussion will be guided by questions that relate to both the era and the themes of AP U.S. History. A similar activity will be the Antebellum Dinner for Eight, which is the same assignment but set in a fictitious dinner for antebellum reformers.

Unit 3 Celebration of Knowledge: Twelve multiple-choice questions, three short-answer questions, and one teacher-created DBQ comparing and contrasting the political ideas in the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution.

 

Unit 4: 1800-1848 [CR2]

[CR2] — Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

The American Pageant, Chapters 11-13

Content: Politics in the early republic; parties and votes; reforms and social movements; culture and religion; market capitalism and slavery; growth of immigration and cities; women and Seneca Falls; and, territorial expansion and the Mexican War.

Primary Source Analysis: Abigail Adams’ “Letter to Mercy Otis Warren” (1776); the Pennsylvania Gazette’s article, “The Indian Prophet and His Doctrine” (1812); the Monroe Doctrine (1823); the Nullification Proclamation (1832); Worcester v. Georgia (1832); Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Self Reliance (1841); [CR1b: textual] Declaration of Rights and Sentiments (1848); the “spot” resolutions (1846); Polk’s war message (1846); map of the spread of the Second Great Awakening; [CR1b: maps] and contrasting illustrations of the Trail of Tears.

[CR1b] — The course includes diverse primary sources including written documents and images as well as maps and quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables).

 

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AP® U.S. History: Syllabus

Author’s Thesis Paper: “The Cult of True Womanhood: 1820-1860” by Barbara Welter [American Quarterly 18, no. 2, part 1 (Summer 1966): 151-174]; “Consensus and Ideology in the Age of Jackson” by Edward Pessen (in Conflict and Consensus, Volume 1. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1997); and “Marbury v. Madison: The case of the ‘Missing’ Commissions” by John Garraty (in Quarrels That Have Shaped the Constitution. New York: Harper and Row, 1964). [CR6]

[CR6] — Students are provided opportunities to analyze and evaluate diverse historical interpretations. — Analyzing Secondary Sources

You Be the Judge: Robert Y. Hayne of South Carolina’s speech from the Senate (1828) vs. Daniel Webster’s reply to Robert Y. Hayne (1828), also known as the Webster-Hayne debate. In small groups, students will examine these two primary sources for the following features: the author’s point of view, author’s purpose, audience, and historical context. Then, students will present their findings to the entire class. [CR5]

[CR5] — Students are provided opportunities to analyze primary sources and explain the significance of an author’s point of view, author’s purpose, audience, and historical context. — Analyzing Primary Sources

History in the Making Assignments: History in the Making, Chapter 18 “The Trail of Tears” and Chapter 21 “The Start of the Mexican-American War.”

Students use SOAPSTone (Speaker, Occasion, Audience, Purpose, Subject, and Tone) to look at Polk’s war message and debate whether that message was a change or continuation of U.S. attitudes and foreign policy. [CR5]

[CR5] — Students are provided opportunities to analyze primary sources and explain the significance of an author’s point of view, author’s purpose, audience, and historical context. — Analyzing Primary Sources

Essay: Students write an essay with a thesis that establishes a historically defensible and evaluative claim based on evidence that examines the causes of Manifest Destiny and U.S. territorial expansion in the nineteenth century and the consequences for Native American nations. [CR9]

[CR9] — Students are provided opportunities to explain different causes and effects of historical events or processes, and to evaluate their relative significance. — Causation

Six Degrees of Separation: From Jefferson to the Reform Era.

Unit 4 Celebration of Knowledge: Twelve multiple-choice questions, three short-answer questions, and one teacher-created long-essay question on antebellum reform.

 

Unit 5: 1844-1877 [CR2]

[CR2] — Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

The American Pageant, Chapters 14-21

Content: Tensions over slavery; reform movements; politics and the economy; cultural trends; transcendentalism and utopianism; the Civil War, rights of freedmen and women, the Reconstruction Era and Freedmen’s Bureau; and the KKK. Focus on white supremacy before and after the Civil War.

Primary Source Analysis: Frederick Douglass’ Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845); [CR1b: textual] Daniel R. Hundley’s “Poor White Trash” (1860); fugitive slave laws (1793, 1850); Dred Scott v. Sanford (1857); Hinton Rowan Helper’s “The Impending Crisis of the South” (1857); Louisa May

 

8

AP® U.S. History: Syllabus

Alcott’s Hospital Sketches (1863); the Lincoln-Douglas debates; map delineating southern secession; and two paintings of Manifest Destiny. [CR1b: visual]

[CR1b] — The course includes diverse primary sources including written documents and images as well as maps and quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables).

Author’s Thesis Paper: Students read selections from Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass by Fredrick Douglass (1845) and Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs (1861). In small groups, they discuss the ideas and identities of former slaves. Each group must write a summary of their findings and compare the ideas and identities of these two slaves to white workers. In their summaries, students will address the following question: “Using race, gender, and class as tools of analysis, what is most important for understanding differences in identities and cultures between white and non-white workers?” (CUL-4.0) [CR4] [CR7]

[CR4] — Students are provided opportunities to apply learning objectives in each of the themes throughout the course.

[CR7] — Students are provided opportunities to compare historical developments across or within societies in various chronological and geographical contexts. — Comparison

You Be the Judge: George Fitzhugh’s Cannibals All! (1957) vs. Dwight Weld’s American Slavery As It Is (1839); Daniel Webster’s “Seventh of March Speech” vs. John C. Calhoun’s speech in the Senate delivered on March 4, 1850; Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass (1855) vs. Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The American Notebooks (1868); and Abraham Lincoln’s speech delivered in Alton, IL (1858) vs. Frederick Douglass’ speech delivered in Alton, IL (1858).

History in the Making Assignments: History in the Making, Chapter 22 “Slavery in America,” Chapter 24 “John Brown at Harper’s Ferry,” and Chapter 28 “Birth of the Ku Klux Klan.”

Students will reflect on Seneca Falls: “In what ways was it a consequence of pre-1848 reform activities and what did it contribute to the movement for women’s rights afterwards?” Write a five-page essay that makes an argument in response to this double-sided question. [CR9]

[CR9] — Students are provided opportunities to explain different causes and effects of historical events or processes, and to evaluate their relative significance. — Causation

Essay: Before the Civil War, a number of reform movements emerged to address the many social issues emerging in society, from education to working conditions to slavery. Students will write an essay that focuses on a minimum of three of these social movements and develops an argument on the extent to which women’s rights and opportunities improved as a result of their participation in these movements. [CR12]

[CR12] — Students are provided opportunities to develop and substantiate an argument using historical reasoning, considering ways diverse or alternative evidence could be used to support, qualify, or modify the argument. — Argument Development

Six Degrees of Separation: From The Liberator to the Compromise of 1877.

Chronological Reasoning Lesson: Students look at the evolution of public policies related to slavery and racial inequality to 1877. After making a list, students write an essay to explain the evolution and moments when change occurred and why. [CR10]

[CR10] — Students are provided opportunities to identify and explain patterns of continuity and change over time, explaining why these patterns are historically significant. — Continuity and Change Over Time

Unit 5 Celebration of Knowledge: Fifteen multiple-choice questions, four short-answer questions, and one teacher created DBQ on the evolution of Lincoln’s opinion on slavery.

 

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AP® U.S. History: Sample Syllabus 2

Unit 6: 1865-1900 [CR2]

[CR2] — Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

The American Pageant, Chapters 22- 28

Content: The rights of freedmen and women; reconstruction, Freedmen’s Bureau and the 1877 Railroad strike; rise of labor unions and the Populist Party; general themes of industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and imperialism; and Indian wars, the Spanish-American War, and conquests in the Pacific.

Primary Source Analysis: Henry Grady’s speech, “The New South” (1886); David Augustus Straker’s The New South Investigated (1888); [CR1b: textual] the Atlanta Compromise (1883); Helen Hunt Jackson’s A Century of Dishonor (1881); Frederick Jackson Turner’s The Significance of the Frontier in American History (1893); wealth, organizing women workers, and our country; The Lure of the City (Directed by Tom Ricketts. Chicago: American Film Manufacturing Co., 1910. DVD.); the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882); the Populist Party platform; the Money Question; William Jennings Bryan’s speech, “The Cross of Gold” (1896); Albert J. Beveridge’s “The March of the Flag” (1898); the “Open Door” in China; map of the overseas possessions of the U.S.; and a variety of Thomas Nast’s political cartoons. [CR1b: visual]

[CR1b] — The course includes diverse primary sources including written documents and images as well as maps and quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables).

Author’s Thesis Paper: Students read “Reconstruction: The Second American Revolution” by James M. McPherson [Constitution (Fall 1990)]; “The Robber Barons” by Matthew Josephson (San Diego: Harcourt, Inc., 1934); and “The Robber Barons Bum Rap” by Maury Klein [City Journal (Winter 1995)]. Then they write an essay arguing for or against annexation of Cuba after the Spanish-American War and create an accompanying editorial paragraph to appear in the New York Times. (WOR-2.0) [CR4]

[CR4] — Students are provided opportunities to apply learning objectives in each of the themes throughout the course.

Students develop a thesis in response to a long-essay question on the role the acquisition of natural resources has played in U.S. foreign policy decisions since the late nineteenth century. Develop a historically defensible and evaluative thesis based on evidence that addresses the following prompt: “To what degree was the desire for resources driving American expansion overseas?” (GEO-1.0) [CR4] [CR11]

[CR4] — Students are provided opportunities to apply learning objectives in each of the themes throughout the course.

[CR11] — Students are provided opportunities to articulate a historically defensible and evaluative claim (thesis). — Argument Development

You Be the Judge: Report on the Joint Committee on Reconstruction (1866) vs. Andrew Johnson’s veto for the First Reconstruction Act (1867), and E. Merton Coulter’s “The South During Reconstruction” vs. Carl N. Degler’s Out of Our Past: The Forces that Shaped Modern America (1959).

History in the Making Assignments: History in the Making, Chapter 29 “Eugene V. Debs and the Pullman Strike” and Chapter 30 “Immigration.”

Essay: Students write an essay with a thesis that establishes a historically defensible and evaluative claim based on evidence on how African Americans in the South built political power during Reconstruction by using new laws, grassroots organizing through churches, education, and economic resources. “Which of these developments did the most for expanding African American political power?” [CR12]

 

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AP® U.S. History: Sample Syllabus 2

[CR12] — Students are provided opportunities to develop and substantiate an argument using historical reasoning, considering ways diverse or alternative evidence could be used to support, qualify, or modify the argument. — Argument Development

Six Degrees of Separation: From the Homestead Act to the Battle of Wounded Knee.

Unit 6 Celebration of Knowledge: Fifteen multiple-choice questions, four short-answer questions, and one teacher created long-essay question on late nineteenth-century immigration.

 

Unit 7: 1890-1945 [CR2]

[CR2] — Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

The American Pageant, Chapters 29-35

Content: The formation of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) and the American Federation of Labor (AFL); industrialization and technology, mass production and mass consumerism, and radio and movies; Harlem Renaissance; Native American culture and boarding schools; political parties and the transition from classical liberalism to New Deal liberalism with the capitalist crisis of the 1930s; and World War II, demographic shifts, the role of women and nonwhites, and battles for economic rights.

Primary Source Analysis: Frederick Winslow Taylor’s The Principles of Scientific Management (1911); Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle (1906); Muller v. Oregon (1908); The Zimmermann Note (1917); Randolph Bourne’s War and the Intellectuals (1917); [CR1b: textual] the Bisbee Deportation of 1917; the Sacco and Vanzetti Case (1926); the Great Migration of African Americans; government and business; FDR’s first inaugural address (1933); Roosevelt’s “court-packing” plan (1937); FDR’s Four Freedoms speech (1941); Korematsu v. United States (1944); Harry Truman’s “The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima-The Public Explanation” (1945); New Deal political cartoons (pro and con); and graph showing economic cycles from the Great Depression through World War II. [CR1b: quantitative]

[CR1b] — The course includes diverse primary sources including written documents and images as well as maps and quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables).

You Be the Judge: Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) vs. Justice Harlan’s dissent on Plessy v. Ferguson (1896); Henry Grady’s speech, “The New South” (1886) vs. Booker T. Washington’s response to solving the race problem, “Patience and Self-Control Needed to Solve the Race Problem” (1903); Jackson Turner’s The Significance of the Frontier in American History (1893) vs. Robert MacDonald on rugged individualism; and Henry Demarest Lloyd’s Wealth Against Commonwealth (1894) vs. Allan Nevins’ John D. Rockefeller (1959).

History in the Making Assignments: History in the Making, Chapter 32 “The Sinking of the USS Maine,” Chapter 36 “Causes of the Stock Market Crash,” and Chapter 39 “Japanese Internment.”

Essay: Using primary sources, students write an essay on how the different policies of FDR and Hoover toward the proper role of government reflected five decades of debates about citizenship, economic rights, and the public good. Be sure to indicate how specific policies reflect the global economic crisis of the 1930s. [CR10]

[CR10] — Students are provided opportunities to identify and explain patterns of continuity and change over time, explaining why these patterns are historically significant. — Continuity and Change Over Time

Six Degrees of Separation: From the sinking of the Maine to Hiroshima.

 

11

AP® U.S. History: Syllabus

Unit 7 Celebration of Knowledge: Eighteen multiple-choice questions, four short-answer questions, and one teacher created DBQ on the Progressive Movement.

Unit 8: 1945-1989 [CR2]

[CR2] — Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

The American Pageant, Chapters 36-39

Content: The atomic age; the affluent society and suburbs; discrimination, Michael Harrington’s The Other America (1962), and the African-American Civil Rights movement; Vietnam and U.S. imperial policies in Latin America and Africa; the beat generation and the student movement; the counterculture movement, the antiwar movement, the women’s movement, the Chicano movement, the American Indian movement, and the gay and lesbian movements; summer riots and the occupation of Alcatraz; LBJ’s “The Great Society” speech (1964) and the rise of the New Right; Ronald Reagan and the rise of poverty; and the Cold War and U.S. role in the world.

Primary Source Analysis: The Marshall Plan (1948) ; William Whyte’s The Organization Man (1956); massive retaliation; Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1954); Michael Harrington’s The Other America (1962); Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail;” Black Power; Vietnamization of the war; the War Powers Act (1941); the Port Huron Statement (1962); the Sharon Statement (1960); chart illustrating the statistics of the draft during the Vietnam War and the casualty rate; and political cartoons (pro and con) of the “Reagan Revolution.” [CR1b: visual]

Origins of the Cold War class debate: Some scholars argue that the Cold War started with the Russian Revolution. Examine primary and secondary sources and in an essay make a case for the Cold War starting in 1945 or 1917.

[CR1b] — The course includes diverse primary sources including written documents and images as well as maps and quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables).

Author’s Thesis Paper: William Rehnquist on the internment of the Japanese, found in All the Laws But One (New York: Knopf, 1988).

You Be the Judge: Harry Truman’s the Truman Doctrine (1947) vs. Ronald Reagan’s “Tear Down This Wall” speech (1987), and Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique (1963) vs. Phyllis Schlafly’s A Choice Not An Echo (1964).

History in the Making Assignments: History in the Making, Chapter 44 “McCarthyism” and Chapter 45 “Desegregation and the Civil Rights Movement.”

Students are asked to present their research on why the American Indian Movement emerged in the 1960s and not the 1930s. [CR8]

[CR8]— Students are provided opportunities to explain the relationship between historical events, developments, or processes and the broader regional, national, or global contexts in which they occurred. — Contextualization

DBQ: Students write a response to the 2001 AP DBQ on the Cold War.

Six Degrees of Separation: From containment to “Tear Down This Wall.”

Using notes and primary sources, students construct a timeline of the civil rights movement from the Reconstruction Era to the 1970s and annotate change and continuity in the movement’s goals and strategies. (POL-2.0) [CR4] [CR10]

 

12

AP® U.S. History Syllabus

[CR4] — Students are provided opportunities to apply learning objectives in each of the themes throughout the course.

[CR10] — Students are provided opportunities to identify and explain patterns of continuity and change over time, explaining why these patterns are historically significant. — Continuity and Change Over Time

Unit 8 Celebration of Knowledge: Fifteen multiple-choice questions, four short-answer questions, and one teacher created DBQ on the rise of the new feminism.

 

Unit 9: 1980-present [CR2]

[CR2] — Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

The American Pageant, Chapters 40-42

Content: Summary of Ronald Reagan’s domestic and foreign policies; George Bush Sr. and the end of the Cold War; Clinton as a New Democrat; technology and economic bubbles and recessions, race relations, and the role of women; changing demographics and the return of poverty; rise of the prison industrial complex and the war on drugs; 9/11 and the domestic and foreign policies that followed; and Obama: change or continuity?

Primary Source Analysis: Jerry Falwell, Listen, America! (1980); the evil empire; William Hyland, The Cold War is Over (1990); the axis of evil; “The New Segregation” by Carl Chancellor and Richard D. Kahlenberg [Washington Monthly (Nov/Dec 2014)]; Betty Friedan, Beyond Gender (1997), Robert Putnam’s Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community (2000); Richard Valelly, “Couch Potato Democracy” (1996); John Lewis Gaddis, “Setting Right a Dangerous World” (2002); and political cartoons (pro and con) on the Patriot Act (2001). [CR1b: visual]

[CR1b] — The course includes diverse primary sources including written documents and images as well as maps and quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables).

Author’s Thesis Paper: “The Man Who Broke the Evil Empire” by Peter Schweizer (in Portrait of America, Combined Edition) and excerpt from The Disuniting of America: Reflections on a Multicultural Society by Arthur Schlesinger (New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1991).

You Be the Judge: The Patriot Act (2001) vs. Amendment IV of the Constitution, and ObamaCare Verdict (2015) vs. Dissent to the ObamaCare ruling (2015).

History in the Making Assignments: History in the Making, Chapter 51 “The Modern Feminist Movement” and Chapter 53 “The Reagan Revolution.”

Students use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the causes and goals of each act as described in excerpts from the 1924, 1965, and 1990 Immigration Acts. (MIG-1.0) [CR4] [CR7]

[CR4] — Students are provided opportunities to apply learning objectives in each of the themes throughout the course.

[CR7] — Students are provided opportunities to compare historical developments across or within societies in various chronological and geographical contexts. — Comparison

Essay: Students write an essay with a thesis that establishes a historically defensible and evaluative claim based on evidence in response to the following question: In what ways did the U.S. government’s response to the attacks on 9/11 change U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East and Asia? [CR11]

[CR11] — Students are provided opportunities to articulate a historically defensible and evaluative claim (thesis). — Argument Development

 

13

AP® U.S. History: Syllabus

Six Degrees of Separation: From the Reagan Revolution to the election of Barack Obama.

Unit 9 Celebration of Knowledge: Six multiple-choice questions, two short-answer questions, and one teacher-created long-essay question on Obama’s domestic policies.

 

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